The Concept of Education

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Education

The concept of education has many facets. This article discusses Montessori’s cosmopolitan education and Dewey’s philosophy of experience and education. Then we discuss the barriers to education in developing countries, including lack of technological development. It’s important to understand how education can be a powerful force for social change. What makes it so effective? This article explores these ideas and more. After reading this article, you should be better equipped to discuss the importance of education.

Secondary education

If you enjoy teaching, you may want to major in Secondary Education. This major requires you to earn a B or higher in all core courses within the program. Many teaching careers also require certification and licensure. After completing the requirements for this major, you may begin teaching high school. There are many benefits to becoming a secondary school teacher. Here are three examples of career opportunities in secondary education:

In secondary school, students are exposed to a wider variety of courses and have increased specialization. Students can also pursue technical or vocational education or direct entry into the workforce. The terminology and nomenclature used in secondary schools may vary by country. Regardless of country, secondary education is vital for a person’s personal growth and development. The skills they gain at secondary school can be applied in the workplace and in life. Here are some examples of what secondary education is and why it’s so important.

Montessori’s vision of ‘cosmic education’

Dr. Maria Montessori’s educational philosophy was based on the interdependence of all living things. She saw children as the key to understanding the cosmic task and associated it with the children of the second plan. Montessori noted children’s natural characteristics as they approached the age of six. The absorbent mind gradually disappeared as the child began to engage in more abstract, moral development. In addition, sensory exploration changed from being purely physical to imaginative and evocative.

The vision of cosmic education encompasses all areas of study and is a general framework for the development of all subjects. This approach also stresses the interconnectedness of all content areas and aims to help children understand their own personal responsibility in relation to other people. Cosmic education also includes music and computer use. In essence, the child is able to understand the universe and how it works. It is the first step toward the development of their own unique gifts.

Dewey’s philosophy of experience and education

John Dewey developed a pragmatic theory of experience to explain how humans learn and grow. This theory has resounded throughout many of Dewey’s books, and reflects his belief that experience is intrinsically linked to growth. Dewey also emphasized the importance of interaction and the material and social context of a person’s situation, as well as the interactions a person has within a learning environment.

John Dewey’s philosophy of experience and educational theory is based on his belief that education should emphasize the quality of the individual experience. Experience consists of interaction and continuity with past experiences and preconceptions. This interaction is essential in promoting learning and meeting the needs of each individual learner. Therefore, Dewey’s philosophy of experience and education focuses on education that fosters critical thinking and self-awareness.

Lack of technological advancement causing barriers to access to education in developing countries

Many countries in developing regions lack technological advancement, especially in rural areas. In China, for example, only about 1 percent of the population has access to the internet, and while it has 70,000 schools equipped with computers, only 10 million of these students have basic computer skills. This is because most of the education infrastructure and skilled teachers are located in cities, and the rural poor lack access to schools. Adding computers to schools has not made these students more likely to obtain an education.

The poorest countries in the world have low educational attainment. Only about a fifth of children complete secondary school, and the percentage of girls is even lower in low-income countries. In developing countries, the combination of income and gender produces crushing results. In Kenya, a study by Oxfam found that girls from low-income families have only a one in 250 chance of pursuing a degree beyond secondary school, compared to one in three for boys from wealthy families.